Cash-Strapped Courts Cut Again

How any organization can absorb almost $100 million in cuts to its funding over a period of three years seems unfathomable.  But, we’re not talking about just any organization here.  We’re talking about the branch of government responsible for interpreting and enforcing the laws of our Commonwealth.

Earlier this week, Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Roderick Ireland and Chief Justice for Administration and Management Robert Mulligan issued a joint statement responding to the Judiciary’s Fiscal Year 2012 appropriation.  Describing the impact that the state budget will have on court operations, the statement included a list of eleven potential courthouse relocations.  The Chief Justices also asked Governor Patrick to stop appointing Trial Court judges for FY12, citing that for each new judge appointed, three members of the court’s staff will have to be laid off.

The issue of adequate funding for the state courts is not new.  The Judiciary has responded admirably to the fiscal pressures of the past three years, but it cannot absorb any more reductions without undermining its constitutional obligation to protect the safety and welfare of our citizens.

If the court consolidations as outlined by Chief Justice Ireland and Chief Justice Mulligan become a reality, there will be undeniable economic and social consequences.  Courthouses are hubs for local businesses that thrive on the thousands of people who use Massachusetts’ courts every day.  Inexorably tied to their surrounding communities, courthouses often harness the power of the justice system to address local problems.  They form creative partnerships and relationships with residents, merchants, churches, schools, and community groups.

Relocating and consolidating courts can also present serious accessibility and public safety issues.  This will mean some people will no longer have access to public transportation even to appear in court.  Court relocations will require litigants to take more time off from work just to settle disputes.

We cannot continue to cut the Judiciary’s budget and expect our court system to deliver the same standard of justice to which we have become accustomed.  It is our responsibility – as lawmakers, judges, and citizens of the Commonwealth – to work together to ensure that justice continue to prevail in Massachusetts.

-Kathleen Joyce

Government Relations Director

BostonBar Association

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