Monthly Archives: May 2017

BBA Law Day Dinner: Celebrating the Leaders who Shape and Protect the Rule of Law

Last week, the BBA hosted its annual Law Day Dinner, which brings together members of the bar, the bench, and the business communities to recognize leaders who shape and protect the rule of law. The event is always one of the highlights of the year here at the BBA, and this time was no exception. The dinner included a keynote speech delivered by Congressman Seth Moulton and presentations of the Thurgood Marshall Award to Elaine Blais of Goodwin and the John G. Brooks Legal Services Award to Anne Mackin of Greater Boston Legal Services (GBLS).

To kick things off, BBA President Carol Starkey, of ConnKavanaugh, addressed the crowd, reflecting on the reason behind this annual event and the original proclamation of Law Day by President Eisenhower 59 years ago. She noted that all in the room were bound by their dedication and commitment to the law and its role in protecting individual rights, preserving justice, and ensuring equality. She took a moment to recognize the judges, custodians of the rule of law, in attendance and expressed gratitude to all members of the Boston legal community for their consistent selfless volunteerism, thoughtful policy contributions, intelligent debate, and persistent advocacy. She concluded her opening remarks by noting that the bar, collectively, continues to ensure, just as President Eisenhower said, that “the importance of law in the daily lives of our citizens is a source of national strength.”

BBA President Carol Starkey (ConnKavanaugh) addresses the crowd.

She went on to present the Thurgood Marshall Award to Elaine Blais, partner and head of litigation in Goodwin’s Boston office. The award recognizes attorneys in private practice in Greater Boston for their extraordinary efforts in enhancing the human dignity of others by providing legal services to Massachusetts’ low income population. Attorney Blais has been representing adults seeking asylum through Political Asylum/Immigration Representation (PAIR) and Immigration Equality for nearly a decade and representing unaccompanied immigrants and refugee children in their deportation proceedings through Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) for the past five years.

BBA president Carol Starkey (ConnKavanaugh) presents honoree Elaine Blais (Goodwin) with the Thurgood Marshall Award.

In a moving acceptance speech, Blais told the story of one particular child she and her team were able to assist in remaining in the U.S., a nine-year-old girl who had been living with her grandmother in El Salvador after her parents fled when they were threatened for standing up to a local gang. This young girl was forced to flee as well when the attention of the gang became directed toward her. Thanks to the hard work and dedication of Blais and her team, the girl was found eligible for asylum, and Blais is now helping to work on the green card application. This story highlights what a difference dedicated pro bono work can make, and Blais herself concluded with a call to action, asking members of the bar to use their unique positions as lawyers to assist those most in need.

Carol Starkey then returned to the stage to present the John G. Brooks Legal Services Award to Anne Mackin of GBLS. This award is presented to professional legal services attorneys for their outstanding work on behalf of indigent people in the Boston area. Attorney Mackin has worked in legal services for nearly 30 years, and joined GBLS’s Immigration Unit in 2013. Since then, she has helped people from all over the world who have witnessed or experienced unspeakable tragedies and faced severe persecutions. Her efforts have ensured that many who are fleeing extreme discrimination and danger are able to seek justice and safe harbor.

BBA president Carol Starkey (Conn Kavanaugh) gives honoree Anne Mackin (GBLS) the John G. Brooks Legal Services Award.

In an acceptance speech that displayed her humility and passion, Mackin discussed how privileged she feels to be able to work in legal services and specifically to be able to meet the brave and resilient individuals and children who have decided, as a matter of survival, to make the hard decision to pursue safety. In her work, she regularly takes on cases with individuals, often young children, who have endured unspeakable torture and abuse, wars and natural disasters and persecution on account of their race, gender, sexuality, or beliefs. She offered several harrowing stories, all of which revealed just how important the law and legal help is for these individuals. After making the often devastating decision to flee the only home they’ve ever known, many face a daunting bureaucracy with complicated and convoluted procedural and substantive rules upon reaching the U.S. Though not every attorney can dedicate their life to this work as Mackin has, her inspiring career reaffirms how crucial it is for all attorneys to take up Blais’ call to action in whatever way they can.

Following these moving speeches, Carol Starkey introduced keynote speaker U.S. Representative Seth Moulton. Congressman Moulton was elected to the represent the 6th District of Massachusetts in 2014, and he currently serves on the House Armed Services Committee and the House Budget Committee. After graduating from Harvard in 2001, Moulton joined the United States Marine Corps, where he served four tours in Iraq as a Marine Corps infantry officer, including two as an infantry platoon commander and two as a Special Assistant to General David Petraeus. After leaving the Marines in 2008, with the rank of Captain, Moulton attended Harvard Business School and the Kennedy School of Government, and worked in the private sector as managing director of the Texas Central Railway.

We welcomed Moulton to the Boston Bar once before, in 2015, when he attended the first of an ongoing Veterans Day reception series, where BBA members who are also current or former members of the military gather to share common experiences and challenges. This time, Congressman Moulton presented a captivating keynote speech that highlighted the notion that the role of lawyers and the rule of law is more important than ever.

Congressman Seth Moulton delivers the keynote speech.

His speech began with a compelling story about a refugee, Mohammed, who was his interpreter in Iraq. The two spent a great deal of time together, even going on to host a popular local TV show together as part of a media and free press initiative. Moulton explained that Mohammed put his life on the line, in an incredibly public way, to aid the U.S., and when he received a Fulbright Scholarship and left Iraq, his family faced such great threats that they had to flee their hometown. If Mohammed returned, he would be facing a life-threatening situation, so he decided to seek asylum, and Moulton helped him secure an attorney who made it possible for him to stay in the U.S. Moulton noted that, through all of the trials, Mohammed still maintained an amazing faith in the system. Moulton highlighted just how crucial it is for Americans to uphold and maintain this trust in the system, as the core of our democracy is respect for the rule of law and its fair application to all.

Lawyers, of course, play a unique role in maintaining the trustworthiness of the system, and, like Attorney Blais, Congressmen Moulton presented a call to action. He urged the crowd to use their authority as members of the Bar to speak up for the rule of law. He even harkened back to a quote from Ross L. Malone, President of the American Bar Association in 1959, who stated “tyrants throughout history have recognized in lawyers a constant threat to their tyranny.” Because lawyers and the judiciary are those charged with upholding the rule of law, he explained that bar associations are important pillars of our civil society and cited current examples of countries where human-rights lawyers are routinely jailed as “dissidents”.

Following this call, he turned his attention to the two award recipients, who are clearly prime examples of lawyers already going above and beyond this call. He spoke on the deep importance of pro bono and legal services work, like that undertaken by Blais and Mackin. This work is critical in instilling trust in the system that Mohammed relied on when carrying out his service for the U.S. and that the attorney fulfilled when taking on Mohammed’s case and ensuring the rule of law was fairly applied.

The Congressman concluded by recalling the most frequent question he got when he first decided to run in 2014: Why would you want to give up your work in the private sector to pursue public service? He said he no longer hears this question because it’s very clear why this service is crucial. He affirmed that no one should question the services of the members of the bar either, as it also is more important than ever.

Overall, it was a wonderful evening that highlighted the significance of the role of lawyers and the rule of law in upholding democratic ideals and ensuring justice for all. Be sure to check out our photo album and join us next year!

—Alexa Daniel
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

BBA Testimony at Judiciary Committee Hearings

We’ve recently reported on our testimony in support of H.2645 (tax basis for certain decedents’ beneficiaries), at the Joint Committee of the Revenue (which later reported the bill favorably to the House Committee on Ways and Means) and our testimony in support of full RUFADAA language (access to digital assets) before the Joint Committee on the Judiciary.  Lest you think our public hearing participation is limited to Trusts and Estates issues, we’ve also had the opportunity to present testimony on three other legislative items at Judiciary Committee hearings held the past few weeks.

Housing Court Expansion

On Tuesday, May 2, the Judiciary Committee heard from the public on bills related to Court Administration, including legislation that would expand jurisdiction of the Housing Court to the full state, which the BBA supports.  We’ve spoken often in the past on the importance of this expansion, identified this as a budget priority, and even recorded a podcast on the matter.

Two identical bills were before the committee, H.978 sponsored by Representative Chris Walsh, and S. 946, sponsored by Senator Karen E. Spilka. These bills would expand access to the Housing Court, and all its accompanying benefits, to all residents of the Commonwealth, including the close to one-third who currently lack such access.

Interestingly, H.978 and S.946 were two of the most highly testified-upon bills at the hearing. Representatives Paul J. Donato and Jay R. Kaufman, Senator Sal N. DiDomenico, and Chief Justice of the Housing Court Judge Tim F. Sullivan all testified in support of the bills.  In addition to these public officials, the Committee heard testimony from a number of key advocates, including Annette Duke of the Massachusetts Law Reform Institute, Elizabeth Soule, Executive Director of MetroWest Legal Services and Laura Rosi, Director of Housing and Advocacy of Housing Families.

We were lucky enough to have Julia Devanthery, Attorney and Clinical Instructor in Housing Clinic of the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School and member of the BBA Delivery of Legal Services Section, presenting testimony on behalf of the BBA as part of a panel, alongside Jeff Catalano of Todd & Weld, president of the Massachusetts Bar Association, and James T. Van Buren, Commissioner of the Access to Justice Commission.

Attorney Devanthery offered specific insight from the perspective of her extensive work supervising the Lawyer for the Day Program in Housing Court, which, since 1999, offers advice, mediation, and case litigation for unrepresented tenants and landlords on Eviction Day at the Housing Court.  She spoke to the importance of expanding this service statewide given the complexity of housing cases, the lack of alternative affordable housing options, and the vulnerability of many pro se tenants and landlords.  She also spoke movingly about her experience representing victims of domestic violence, noting that this clientele, which is uniquely vulnerable, is able to have their cases adjudicated by Housing Court in a manner which takes into account abuse, while taking advantage of the specialized legal protections in place to defend survivors and their children.

We’ll keep you updated on the report of the Joint Committee on the Judiciary on H.978 and S.946, and be sure to watch this space for our soon-to-come Senate budget update (Spoiler Alert: Unlike the House Ways and Means Budget proposal, the Senate Ways and Means budget does include funding and authorizing language for Housing Court Expansion).

UCCJEA

Earlier this week, the Committee held its second day of hearings on Probate and Family matters, this time taking up two topics on which the BBA has worked for a number of years. First up, An Act relative to the Uniform Child Custody Justice Enforcement Act (UCCJEA), S.806, filed once again by Senator Cynthia Stone Creem.  As we’ve outlined in the past, enactment of this bill would remedy conflicts that occur under current Massachusetts law when one of the parents of the child moves to another state. Currently, Massachusetts is the only state in the US which has not enacted the UCCJEA!

As it stands now, Massachusetts law cedes jurisdiction over our own custody orders to the home state of the custodial parent and child after six months of their residency in the new venue.  But under the UCCJEA, once a state has exercised jurisdiction over custody, that state retains exclusive jurisdiction as long as a parent, the child, or someone acting as a parent remains in the original issuing state. Overall, adoption of the UCCJEA would help to prevent one parent from forum-shopping by seeking a more favorable outcome in another state and also prevent the problem of dueling lawsuits in different jurisdictions.

A panel with representatives from the BBA, MBA, and the Women’s Bar Association (WBA), all of whom support passage of the bill now that domestic-violence concerns have been addressed with new language in the bill, presented testimony on behalf of the UCCJEA.  Judge Edward Ginsburg spoke on behalf of the BBA, and as usual offered compelling reasons for Massachusetts adoption.  If you’ll recall, Judge Ginsburg has spent nearly twenty years advocating for Massachusetts to change the law.

Stay tuned to find out if this will finally be the year that Massachusetts becomes the 50th state to adopt the UCCJEA!

Shared Parenting

Finally, Jessica Dubin of Lee & Rivers, our Family Law Section co-chair, spoke about a number of bills being heard that would amend Section 31 of Chapter 208 of the Massachusetts General Laws, dealing with child custody and shared parenting.  While the BBA has not specifically endorsed any of the bills pending in the Judiciary Committee, in 2015, the Family Law Section Steering Committee worked hard to develop principles related to shared parenting that would guide the BBA’s analysis of all related legislation. For example, the principles call for the availability of alternative terminology such as “parenting time”, “residential responsibility” and “decision-making responsibility,” in place of the divisive and outdated terms, “visitation” and “custody.”  The principles also offer support for provisions that provide increased guidance on the content to be included in parenting plans and oppose any provision that takes any focus away from the best interests of the child or ties the hands of judges.

Attorney Dubin offered the BBA’s appreciation to the Judiciary Committee for its consideration of the similar legislation last session and its openness to the input of the bar on the pending bills.  She expressed a hope that the BBA would have the same opportunities this session and relayed the current work being done to study Senator Will Brownsberger’s bill, S.775, An Act relative to determining the best interest of children in Probate and Family Court.

As usual, watch this space to find out what happens!

Many more hearings are set to be scheduled for the coming months, and we’ll report back on our continued activity!

—Alexa Daniel
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

RUFADAA Update: Testimony at Judiciary Committee Hearing and Podcast

In March, we updated you on the BBA’s endorsement, at the request of the Trusts and Estates Law Section, of the adoption of the Revised Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets Act (RUFADAA) in the Commonwealth.

To briefly recap, RUFADAA was promulgated by the Uniform Law Commission in 2016 in response to a lack of guidance as to what happens to a person’s digital assets (think Facebook, Instagram, online banking) when they die or become incapacitated. Very few individuals leave clear direction on the handling of these assets and those companies in charge of the on-line accounts have varied and often difficult-to-locate policies, if they have any policies on the matter at all. RUFADAA helps to add clarity by creating a formal process to determine a fiduciary’s authority to access digital assets while also balancing privacy concerns and limiting unwarranted disclosure of private communications. Since its promulgation in 2015, at least 30 other states have adopted RUFADAA in some form. (Check out our previous blog post on this for a full refresher on the contents of RUFADAA.)

On Monday, the Joint Committee on the Judiciary (“the Committee”) heard testimony from three different panels on bills that deal with access to digital assets.

The Committee first heard testimony from the Ajemian siblings in support of, S.822, “An Act Relative to Access to a Decedent’s Electronic Mail Accounts,” sponsored by Senator Cynthia Stone Creem. As you’ll recall, the Ajemian siblings are parties to Ajemian v. Yahoo!, Inc., regarding the contents of an e-mail account established by their late brother.  There, the Supreme Judicial Court is currently determining whether the federal Stored Communications Act (SCA), 18 U.S.C. § 2702, prohibits disclosure of the contents of a deceased e-mail account-holder’s account to the administrators of his or her estate. In that case, the Ajemian siblings, the administrators of their brother’s estate, argue, in part, that they should have access under an exception to the Act, as agents for the decedent.

S.822 applies only to e-mail accounts but allows greater access to those accounts than the requirements set forth in RUFADAA. The bill allows personal representatives to gain access to the contents of an e-mail account upon a notarized written request by the personal representative or an order of the probate court that has jurisdiction over the estate of the decedent. Upon receipt of the request, the service provider has 60 days to comply, and this requirement supersedes provisions in e-mail service provider contracts, terms and conditions, or privacy policy unless the provider can show “by clear and convincing evidence, that it offered opt-out language, separate and distinct from the standard agreement or terms of service, whereby the decedent affirmatively declined to have the decedents electronic mail account released after dead.”

Next up, representatives from Facebook and NetChoice testified in opposition to S.822 and in support of Senator Lesser’s S.885, “An Act Relative to the Privacy of a Decedent’s Electronic Communication” (and Representative Livingstone’s identical H.3083, “An Act for Uniform Fiduciary Access to Digital Assets”). These bills are largely the same of RUFADAA, except the language limits the definition of “fiduciary” to a personal representative, while RUFADAA would cover personal representatives, conservators, trustees, and agents acting under the power of attorney. Notably, the Facebook witness also stated that they would be completely comfortable with the adoption of the full RUFADAA language instead of the more narrow S.885 or H.3083. These witnesses opposed S.822 because of the broader access to accounts the bill allows, as they worry it will push them to violate privacy guarantees, put them in conflict with the federal SCA, and tie them up in litigation.

This brings us to the final panel, which instead of testifying in support of any of the current bills, called for adoption of the full RUFADAA language, even though it hasn’t yet been filed in Massachusetts. BBA Trusts and Estates Section Co-Chair Joe Bierwirth, of Hemenway & Barnes, testified on behalf of the BBA, alongside Colin Korzec, of U.S. Trust, and Marc Bloostein, of Ropes and Gray, on behalf of the Standing Committee on Massachusetts Legislation Relating to Wills, Trusts, Estates and Fiduciary Administration (“Standing Committee”).

Joe Bierwirth, Colin Korzec, and Marc Bloostein (right to left) testify in support of RUFADAA at Joint Committee on the Judiciary hearing. 

Overall, the panel presented the reasons for adoption of the complete RUFADAA language, including the balance it strikes in allowing access while also protecting privacy, and the clarity and certainty it will offer for fiduciaries, digital account users, and digital account service providers. The witnesses also stressed the unified support this language has achieved, both nationally, with adoption by more and more states in rapid succession over the past two years, and locally, with the BBA, the Massachusetts Bar Association, and the Massachusetts Bankers Association having all officially endorsed the RUFADAA language. (The written testimony offered by the panel also included the Standing Committee’s Massachusetts-specific analysis of RUFADAA, complete with proposed edits to the ULC’s model language in order to ensure it complies with the Massachusetts General Laws).

One thing all witnesses agreed on is that this is an issue crying out for action from the Legislature, in order to provide some clarity to what is now quite a grey area. As always, we’ll keep you posted on RUFADAA throughout the legislative session!

In related news, the BBA isn’t just sticking with legislative testimony to get the word out about RUFADAA. You won’t want to miss our podcast featuring Trusts and Estates co-chairs, Joe Bierwirth and Andy Rothstein, of Goulston & Storrs.

—Alexa Daniel
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

BBA at ABA Day 2017

Each April, BBA leadership treks to Washington, D.C., along with bar leaders from all 50 states, for ABA Day, the American Bar Association’s annual lobbying event.  This year, as usual, the primary focus of our efforts was on funding for civil legal aid.  And though federal appropriations were under threat at the time of our trip last week, by this week we had received welcome news—from both the Capitol and the State House.

First, a refresher: The Legal Services Corporation (LSC) is the nation’s leading funder of civil legal aid programs, with an annual appropriation of $385 million, of which about $5 million comes to four different providers in Massachusetts.  That budget is not nearly enough: It’s been essentially level-funded for years, even as the need for legal services has increased significantly, and one result is that an estimated 50 to 80% of qualified applicants must be turned away merely for lack of resources.

That’s why it’s critical that lawyers, who are at the front lines of this crisis, continue to make the case for LSC and civil legal aid.  The threat was even greater this time, after a White House budget plan proposed eliminating (or “zeroing out,” in budget-speak) LSC funding altogether.  A $5 million hit to legal services in Massachusetts alone would have been devastating—all the more so when you consider that the budget also sought deep cuts in services elsewhere, cuts that would’ve further increased the need for legal services.

All of this had legal-services providers on edge and lent a sense of urgency to this year’s ABA Day (which, full disclosure, takes place over three days). So it was nice to kick the event off with an awards ceremony for four members of Congress who’ve led the fight on ABA priorities, including our own Representative Joe Kennedy.

 

Rep. Joe Kennedy receiving the ABA Justice Award, alongside (left to right)
MBA President Jeff Catalano, ABA President Linda Klein, MBA President-Elect Chris Sullivan,
BBA President-Elect Mark Smith, and BBA President Carol Starkey

We’re proud of Rep. Kennedy for making this a priority and we were not only delighted to nominate him, along with the Massachusetts Bar Association, for an ABA Justice Award in recognition of his steadfast work to promote funding for legal aid and to end discrimination, but also thrilled to learn he’d been chosen as one of this year’s honorees.  To cite just one example of his commitment, Rep. Kennedy established a bipartisan Access to Civil Legal Services Caucus.  (The next morning, at an ABA breakfast, we heard from his caucus co-chair from across the aisle, Rep. Susan Brooks of Indiana.)

In receiving the award—after needling ABA President Linda Klein, of Atlanta, about the Super Bowl—Rep. Kennedy told the audience how his time as a young attorney with Greater Boston Legal Services had opened his eyes, allowing him to see the justice system through the eyes of his clientele: that is, as a complex maze that they couldn’t always navigate successfully without legal assistance.  He spoke of civil legal aid as a lifeline for working families—one that we need to fight for now more fiercely than ever before.  He thanked the BBA and MBA for making it such a priority, and he closed by saying, “Our laws reflect the promises we make.  Our justice system reflects the promises we keep.”  (Of course you already know this, because you followed my live-tweeting, right?)

“Our laws reflect the promises we make.  Our justice system reflects the promises we keep.”
—Rep. Joe Kennedy, ABA Justice Award recipient

With that event fresh in our minds, we headed off the next morning for a full day of meetings with the Massachusetts Congressional delegation.  To be clear, we have it much easier than the ABA Day participants from most other states, in that all our representatives stand with us four-square on LSC funding.  Our counterparts from elsewhere had their work cut out for them, educating their elected officials on the importance of, and the imminent threat to, the appropriation for civil legal aid.  Meanwhile, our group—including the BBA’s President, Carol Starkey of ConnKavanaugh, and President-Elect, Mark Smith of Laredo & Smith, along with their opposite numbers from the MBA, Jeff Catalano of Todd & Weld and Chris Sullivan of Robins Kaplan—had the opportunity to convey our appreciation for the delegation’s consistent support on our issues.

This extends not only to LSC, but also to the other top priority for ABA Day this year: access to justice for homeless veterans.  While the nation has made progress in recent years toward eliminating homelessness among our veteran population, there remain 39,000 homeless vets on any given night—and a staggering 1.5 million who live in poverty.  They face legal problems that are common to the poor, but also problems that stem directly from their service.  For example, time overseas—and, in particular, service-related disabilities, both physical and mental—can undermine a veteran’s ability to address legal issues when they arise, and if allowed to persist, these legal problems can become total barriers to critically-needed help.

 

Carol Starkey and Jeff Catalano with Rep. Mike Capuano,
a strong supporter of civil legal aid, as well as access to justice for homeless veterans

So on behalf of the ABA, we urged our members of Congress to enact the Homeless Veterans Legal Services Act, which would expand access to legal services for homeless veterans, and veterans at risk of homelessness, by authorizing the VA to partner with public and private entities and fund a portion of the cost of legal services.

That night, we attended an ABA reception at the Supreme Court, where Justice Elena Kagan spoke from the heart about advocacy for legal aid (“You are doing the Lord’s work,” she said), awards were given to Kids in Need of Defense (KIND) and long-time supporter Edwin Harnden of Barran Liebman (Portland, Oregon), and attendees more or less had the run of that historic building.

 

Carol Starkey and Mark Smith outside the US Supreme Court

ABA Day closed with a breakfast on our third day, where we got to hear from James Burnham of the Office of White House Counsel, who spoke about the work of his office, including the appointment of federal judges.  (We’ll have a new nomination for the bench in Massachusetts, with Judge George O’Toole, Jr., moving to senior status after 35 years as a state and federal judge.)  And finally, we were entertained by Minnesota Senator Al Franken, who made clear his fierce opposition to zeroing out LSC funding, calling such a move “callous”, “short-sighted”, and “penny-wise and pound-foolish.”   “We’re not gonna let that happen!” he pledged.

 

Sen. Al Franken speaking at an ABA Day breakfast

Sen. Al Franken: Eliminating LSC funding would be “callous”, “short-sighted”, and “penny-wise and pound-foolish” and “we’re not gonna let that happen!”

And with that, we were off.  But, oh yeah, I saved the best news for last:

  1. The same week we were traveling to D.C., the Massachusetts House was taking up its debate on the annual state budget—where, of course, the appropriation for civil legal aid is a top BBA priority. Here, the leading provider of funding is the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation (MLAC).  We’ve covered that issue extensively in this space, but the update is that not only did the House Ways & Means Committee provide for a $1.5 million increase in the MLAC line-item, but thanks to a floor amendment last week from Ruth Balser, long-time champion of civil legal aid, the final House budget increased that figure to $2 million.  That would bring the total to $20 million, but now the debate shifts to the Senate, which will put forth their own plan later this month.  We will of course keep you updated…
  2. This week we learned that the Congress had worked out a spending plan to cover the remainder the current federal fiscal year, ending September 30. And we were relieved to see that it level-funds LSC at $385 million once again.  That’s well short of the $450 million we were asking for, but still far, far better than the $0 that the White House had recommended.  So the news came as a relief … but also a spur to continue our advocacy on this, because the justice gap is not going away any time soon.

—Michael Avitzur
Government Relations Director
Boston Bar Association