Quick Takes from the BBA on the 2018 Election

From a policy issue that has been central to the BBA’s recent advocacy efforts, to races all over the state, we wanted to provide our members with a roundup of outcomes in this year’s election that are relevant to the BBA’s work and to civic life in Massachusetts generally.

Yes on 3:

Question 3—a referendum asking whether to maintain the state law that includes transgender individuals among those protected from discrimination in public accommodations—passed easily, earning nearly 70% of the vote. The BBA lent its strong support to the “Yes on 3” effort—just as we had for the original law, which was enacted in 2016. The BBA joined the broad Freedom for All Massachusetts coalition to retain these civil-rights protections at their first statewide electoral test, and ensure that a strong message was sent to other states. Yes on 3’s victory marks the first time these kinds of legal protections for transgender individuals have been upheld by a popular vote, and represents a momentous victory for transgender rights in Massachusetts.

We are extremely grateful to the campaign’s leaders and organizers, and to our members who volunteered at Yes on 3: Freedom for All Massachusetts canvassing events over the past several months. We can’t wait to celebrate the hard work and success of the Yes on 3 Campaign at this year’s Beacon Award.

District Attorney Races

Rachael Rollins was elected Suffolk County District Attorney, and Andrea Harrington won the race in Berkshire County – the first women to ever hold either of these seats. Incumbents in those counties, Dan Conley and David Capeless, each departed shortly before the end of their term. Rollins, a former BBA Council member, has named current BBA Vice President Marty Murphy of Foley Hoag and current co-chair of our Civil Rights & Civil Liberties Section, Natashia Tidwell of Hogan Lovells, to co-chair her transition team, as she prepares to take office in January. Locally, Middlesex DA Marian Ryan was among the remainder of incumbents who were re-elected, bringing to three the number of female district attorneys (of 11).

State and Congressional Election

All statewide elected officials won re-election easily, and Ayanna Pressley represents the only change to the state’s Congressional delegation. She will replace Michael Capuano, becoming the first black woman sent to D.C. from Massachusetts. While there will be many new faces in the Legislature as the result of natural turn-over, the party balance will be only slightly different, with Democrats padding their veto-proof majorities in each house.

Looking Ahead

With new faces in the State Legislature, we will be paying close attention to the appointment of chairs to the various legislative committees in the coming months. In particular, there will need to be new chairs for each house’s Ways & Means Committee. And finally, all members of the Governor’s Council, the body tasked with confirming gubernatorial nominations to the judiciary, won re-election.

Stay tuned for more updates on how this election may impact our policy priorities in the coming year!

—Michael Avitzur
Government Relations Director
Boston Bar Association