Posts Categorized: justice system

Juvenile Justice Through Diversion

A couple of weeks ago, we were pleased to report on our Juvenile Restorative Justice Symposium, a half-day program focused on restorative justice approaches for young offenders.  Restorative justice represents a paradigm shift in understanding and approaching justice.  It shifts the focus onto the needs of the injured party rather than a sort of generalized societal need to carry out a punishment. Central to the restorative justice system is the so-called “circle” approach (this video includes more information on the circle process), whereby the impacted individuals sit in a circle to have a dialogue mediated by a trained facilitator.

Today, we are excited to report on our latest program, a July 19 forum on diversion and evidence-based approaches to juvenile justice, hosted by the BBA’s Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Section along with Citizens for Juvenile Justice.  Diverting juveniles is the practice of referring them to various programs that hold them accountable without having the go through the traditional justice system.  The restorative justice approach explained in our prior post is one example of a diversion approach.  The goal is to hold youths accountable without creating a criminal record.

This is especially important in Massachusetts, which does not permit record expungement.  The day before our program, the Boston Globe posted an informative article on this very issue, explaining the challenges individuals with juvenile records can face for many years after their cases are resolved in the justice system.  On July 12, the Senate supported a bill (S2424) by a vote of 31-9 that would, among other reforms, permit expungement of misdemeanor offenses from juvenile records.

Regardless of whether the bill is enacted, the take-away from our forum was clear – diversion, when executed correctly, can be more effective at achieving justice, promoting rehabilitation, and reducing recidivism than traditional justice systems.  The fact that it avoids creation of a record that can hinder a young people for the rest of their lives is only an added benefit.

DSC_0083 croppedSana Fadel Delivers Opening Remarks

Massachusetts is making progress on diversion, but the presenters made clear that there is still a long way to go.  At this point, Sana Fadel, Deputy Director of Citizens for Juvenile Justice, who’s Executive Director Naoka Carey provided closing remarks, explained that diversion programs are established ad hoc and vary by county.  As a result, we have instances of “justice by geography,” in the words of First Justice of the Middlesex Juvenile Court, Jay Blitzman, whereby geography plays a disproportionate role in determining juvenile justice outcomes (check out his July 20 editorial on juvenile record expungement from Commonwealth Magazine).  This also hinders the collection of clear data on effectiveness and outcomes.  Yet while uniformity is still a goal, Fadel reported that things seem to be moving in the right direction, in large part thanks to support from the District Attorneys who have implemented diversion programs in 10 of 11 jurisdictions.

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Judge Blitzman

One of the key points made by multiple panelists was the need for individualized and graduated responses in diversion.  While diversion done well has repeatedly resulted in positive outcomes, diversion done poorly can have the opposite effect.  The key is to require the appropriate level of engagement for the youthful offender.  Too little and the point doesn’t get across, too much and the diversion program can stifle a youth’s positive connections outside the justice system and build resistance and resentment.  However, with the proper amount of diversion programming, youths exhibit a remarkable tendency to learn from their mistakes, make victims whole again, and avoid future criminal behavior.

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Panelists (left to right): Kara Hayes, Vincent Schiraldi, and Judge Blitzman

Vincent Schiraldi, Senior Research Fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Program in Criminal Justice, spoke about how he worked to increase diversion as New York City’s commissioner of probation.  Through collaboration with the probation department, schools, courts, police, and even big box stores, the leaders of which he convinced to not prosecute all juvenile shoplifters, he was able to divert 41% of juvenile cases, an increase of more than 15%.  A large part of his success appeared to be driven by his tireless efforts toward bringing the community together to embrace diversion as a reasonable justice system alternative and also by tracking and regularly reporting data demonstrating the effectiveness of his work.

Massachusetts is still far from these levels of diversion, but panelists made clear that it is increasingly being accepted as a reasonable alternative to traditional justice.  Kara Hayes, Chief of Community Engagement at the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office, reported that 25% of juveniles in Suffolk County are currently diverted before being arraigned.  This seems to place us in a similar position as New York City prior to Vincent’s arrival, and the stars appear to be aligning for further increases.  As Kara explained, diversion programs are also beneficial to victims, who often gain more satisfaction and closure than through the justice system, which can be impersonal and leave them feeling cast aside.  As a result, the Suffolk County District Attorney’s office is starting a pilot diversion program in the county that it hopes to have up and running by the start of the school year.  The pilot will include a dedicated program coordinator whose goal is to continue the thoughtful and strategic expansion of diversion to best fulfill the needs of the community.

We are devoted to continuing to provide thought provoking and timely programs and discussions on these sorts of developing areas of justice.  We hope program attendees left feeling informed and empowered to make an impact and we look forward to keeping you apprised of the latest developments in juvenile justice practice.

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

Budget Update

On July 8, the Governor signed the budget amid news that the Commonwealth faces a nearly $1 billion budget deficit.  Despite vetoing $256 million from the Legislature’s conference committee budget (H4450), the Governor maintained a $1 million increase for civil legal aid funding and highlighted the increase in his budget message.

From here, the budget returns to the Legislature, which can override the Governor’s vetoes with a two-thirds vote in each branch.  The House votes first, followed by the Senate. Here is a breakdown of where things currently stand (updated to reflect the Governor’s final budget):

Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation (MLAC)

  • Request: $27,000,000
  • Governor’s Budget: $17,170,000
  • House Ways and Means Budget: $18,000,000
  • House Final Budget: $18,500,000 ($500,000 added through a floor amendment)
  • Senate Ways and Means Budget: $17,000,000
  • Senate Final: $18,000,000 ($1,000,000 added through a floor amendment)
  • Conference Committee Final: $18,000,000
  • Governor Final: $18,000,000

We are thrilled that the Governor included an extra $1 million in funding for legal services over last year’s figure.  Given the extremely challenging budget situation, this increase is truly remarkable and demonstrates a clear commitment from legislators to assist those in need of civil legal aid.  It also continues to show the message of our BBA Task Force to Expand Civil Legal Aid in Massachusetts—that MLAC funding produces a positive return on investment by preventing “back-end” costs—has gotten through.

Trial Court

  • Request: $654,374,856 + Modules for additional initiatives
  • Governor’s Budget: $638,606,000
  • House Ways and Means Budget: $639,900,000 (including Specialty Courts module)
  • House Final Budget: $639,900,000 (including Specialty Courts module)
  • Senate Ways and Means Budget: $643,484,303
  • Senate Final Budget: $643,484,303
  • Conference Committee Final: $639,762,683
  • Governor Final: $632,969,055

It is unfortunate that this number was not higher, but we nevertheless appreciate that this funding amount is a slight increase over last year’s appropriation of $631.5 million.  In order for the courts to continue to provide the highest level of justice for the people of Massachusetts, they need adequate funding.  Underfunding of the courts will present a number of challenges, from infrastructure problems (many court houses need significant repairs and updates as well as security updates) to stifling innovations such as the Specialty Courts program, which addresses the issues underlying criminal behavior and produces great outcomes by reducing recidivism.

Statewide Housing Court Expansion

  • Request: $2,400,000
  • Governor’s Budget: $1,000,000
  • House Ways and Means Budget: $0
  • House Final Budget: $0
  • Senate Ways and Means Budget: $1,194,614
  • Senate Final Budget: $1,194,614
  • Conference Committee Final: $0
  • Governor Final: $0

The BBA has been advocating for the statewide expansion of Housing Court for the last year. Housing Court has statutory jurisdiction over civil and criminal cases that involve the health, safety, or welfare of the occupants or owners of residential housing, as well as code enforcement cases. One of its greatest strengths is that its judges are experienced in these issues and best able to address the complexities and nuances of each case.

The total cost to the state for the expansion is estimated to be roughly $2.4 million per year.  The Governor’s budget proposal included $1 million for Specialty Court, enough to get it started and operational for the last 6 months of FY17, but the House did not follow his lead, leaving this measure out of its budget entirely.  The Senate provided similar language and funding to the Governor’s proposal, but disappointingly, the Conference Committee did not.  We hope this measure will resurface at a later stage in this year’s session, even if only in the form of legislative language authorizing the expansion (but with no money attached).

We look forward to keeping you updated on the latest budget developments and, as always, urge you to make your voice heard at the State House.

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

Criminal Justice Reform through Juvenile Restorative Justice

It was quite a week here at the Boston Bar Association and we’ve got you covered here in case you missed any of the action.  First is a write-up from our Juvenile Restorative Justice Symposium, a half day program developed by the BBA’s 2015-16 Public Interest Leadership Program (PILP).  Further below is a breakdown of our Benefits of Judicial Diversity program followed by an explanation of a recent Appeals Court decision on reopening settlement agreements in divorce cases.

PILP assembles an annual class of young attorneys with interest in civic engagement and public service who are looking to embrace the leadership role of lawyers in service to their community, their profession, and the Commonwealth.  PILP participants connect with prominent community leaders at meetings and events, learn about the challenges confronting local organizations and take part in efforts to address specific community needs.  After completing the 14-month program, graduates enter a growing network of accomplished alumni who provide mentoring and support to their successors.

This year’s PILP class took an interest in restorative justice, a model used as an approach to criminal justice and community harm that emphasizes repairing the damage done by a criminal event as opposed to just handing down a punishment.  It is a collaborative decision-making process that brings together the offenders, victims, and other affected community members.  It seeks to hold offenders accountable by acknowledging and taking responsibility for their offenses.  Studies have shown that recidivism rates are significantly reduced for participants in restorative justice programs, and the costs are far lower than traditional court processes such as prosecution and incarceration.

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Erin Freeborn

The symposium began with an introduction by Erin Freeborn, Executive Director of Communities for Restorative Justice (C4RJ).  She explained the four principles of restorative justice, a process that has existed in some form or another since the dawn of human society.  They are:

  1. Voluntary participation
  2. Crime, meaning a violation of people and relationships creating a harm that needs to be rectified.
  3. Inclusion and empowerment of those most affected. Part of the process is to find out how to rectify the situation, sometimes with information (an explanation for why the crime was committed) and/or sometimes with material needs.
  4. An understanding that the harm cannot be undone, but that all parties will strive to make things as right as possible to try to put the situation back into balance and collaboratively restore order.

Restorative justice represents a paradigm shift in understanding and approaching justice.  It shifts the focus onto the needs of the injured party rather than a sort of generalized societal need to carry out a punishment for the offender.

Traditional Approach Restorative Justice Approach
What law was broken?  How will the offender be charged? Who has been hurt?
Who did it? What are the victim’s needs?
What should we do to them?  What will be their punishment/sentence? Who is obligated to meet those needs and how can they do so?

Central to the restorative justice system is the so-called “circle” approach (this video includes more information on the circle process), whereby the impacted individuals sit in a circle to have a dialogue mediated by a trained facilitator who sets their expectations and lays the ground rules:

  • Everyone takes turns talking and has their chance to speak without interruption.
  • There is no hierarchy, so the facilitator or judge, the victim, and the accused individual are all on equal footing.
  • The circle can include supporters of each party, so in the juvenile context this may mean family members or friends of the offender, as well as the victim.
  • Everyone must take part voluntarily and can pull out at any time and insist on the traditional justice methods.
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Panelists discussing juvenile restorative justice

An extensive panel discussion followed with an examination of current applications of juvenile restorative justice in the Commonwealth.  It was moderated by Northeastern University School of Law Professor Susan Maze-Rothstein and featured five leaders in the restorative and criminal justice field:

The panelists began by considering the appropriateness and effectiveness of restorative justice.  There seemed to be consensus that restorative justice can and often does work better than traditional methods, and that once arraignment takes place and juveniles are given a record, their lives are forever changed, so it is especially important to consider carefully what happens before that step.  Furthermore, restorative justice can serve as a means of reconsidering juvenile justice generally and the need to discuss and change behaviors for youths.  As Commissioner Dolan explained, the traditional response was to simply remove youthful offenders from their situation and hold them in detention for a certain amount of time without providing any help to resolve the incident or underlying issues.  Now, thanks at least in part to the ideas underlying restorative justice, there is a far greater focus on intervening with a holistic approach to solve problems – both to restore balance from the incident leading to the detention and also to resolve underlying issues that prompted the behavior.

While the panelists spoke of their positive experiences with juvenile restorative justice in Massachusetts, they also repeatedly spoke of New Zealand, an international leader in restorative justice, which passed legislation to completely overhaul its juvenile criminal justice system in order to focus its time and resources on restorative justice practices.  As Ziyad Hopkins explained from his own research there, the New Zealand law requires that juvenile offenders take part in a restorative justice program before they can possibly enter the court system, and often provides a means for them to avoid the traditional justice system altogether.  As a result, the number of cases in juvenile court dropped by 80% and juvenile arrest rates did as well.

However, best restorative justice practices are still being developed in Massachusetts.  Panelists discussed the importance of protecting confidentiality in restorative justice discussions, especially should the case end up utilizing traditional justice processes.  Potential misuse of restorative justice discussions to fish for evidence would undermine the entire process.  There were also concerns about whether offenders in restorative justice proceedings need representation by an attorney.  On one hand, legal representation ensures that accused juveniles understand the process and that their rights are protected.  As one panelist put it, all diversion programs inherently implicate a certain level of coercion, and thus it is of the utmost importance that a juvenile and their family have someone to explain the process, options, and minutiae to them.  Furthermore, juveniles have underdeveloped verbal and processing skills and the restorative justice process can be intimidating – an attorney assures the offender’s voice is heard.  On the other hand, it starts to make restorative justice proceedings more similar to traditional justice and may stifle the free and willing exchange of ideas these procedures require in order to be effective.

Currently, restorative justice programs vary greatly by location within the Commonwealth.  They have been implemented piecemeal in certain communities and are yet to catch on in others.  The hope seems to be that they will continue to spread on a grassroots level as more communities recognize their value and importance and that eventually legislation may provide for a uniform and adequately funded statewide system.  There currently is legislation pending (S71/H368, An Act promoting restorative justice practices), which panelists supported, though they noted that it stops short of requiring restorative justice proceedings.

The keynote speaker, First Justice of the Middlesex County Juvenile Court Jay Blitzman, has been a pioneer in the restorative justice field.  He told how his views shifted on restorative justice.  When he first heard of the idea as a “hard-charging defense attorney” he was appalled, feeling like youths were giving up their right to have an attorney stand up for their interests.  It was not until he took part in the “circle” process that he realized that in many ways restorative justice was a richer way for young people to be heard.  He found that taking part in the circle made him a more reflective listener, less judgmental, and better able to facilitate traditional justice proceedings.

He noted the importance of engaging youths through restorative justice.  The circle process gives them a voice, balancing accountability with support.  It assists the community both by solving the problem(s) at hand and by bringing the involved individuals more into the community by encouraging them to take responsibility for their actions, devise a solution, and avoid creating a record.  Justice Blitzman described a common scenario in which a juvenile is involved in a domestic violence case against a family member – typically, a parent or sibling.  These cases rarely go to trial, and are often dismissed, but once the juvenile is arraigned, they have a record which can have many negative consequences for their ability to return to their community, such as limits on housing and jobs.  He suggested that an expungement bill currently before the legislature (S64) could fix part of the problem, but noted that the better solution was to avoid creating the record in the first place through restorative justice proceedings.

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Senator Jamie Eldridge

Senator Jamie Eldridge, a legislative leader on criminal justice issues and Co-Chair of the Harm Reduction and Drug Law Reform Caucus, led a lunch discussion on the future of restorative justice in Massachusetts.  He described the aforementioned bills and their status in the Legislature.  As the sponsor of restorative justice legislation himself, he was hopeful that they might move this session and encouraged attendees to reach out to their legislators to voice their support.  However, he was frank that they faced uphill battles to pass in the final month of this legislative session.  He was optimistic that restorative justice measures might be included in a more comprehensive criminal justice overhaul that he predicted would come next legislative session following the full report of the Council of State Governments, which is conducting an in-depth review of the current criminal justice picture in Massachusetts at the request of Governor Charlie Baker, Speaker of the House Robert DeLeo, Senate President Stanley Rosenberg, and Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Ralph Gants.

In all, the symposium was a huge success.  The discussion was lively and informative and we are proud to be at the forefront of considering this issue.  We will, as always, keep you posted on what happens with the relevant legislation this session and look forward to reporting on forthcoming criminal justice reforms.

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

Discussing the Benefits of Judicial Diversity

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BBA Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Section Co-Chair Rahsaan Hall moderating the panel discussion.

On June 27, we were pleased to host another important discussion at the BBA, this one on The Benefits of Judicial Diversity.  It featured a panel of esteemed individuals including:

  • Roderick L. Ireland, Chief Justice (Ret.) of the Supreme Judicial Court and Distinguished Professor, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, Northeastern University
  • Angela M. Ordoñez, Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Probate and Family Court
  • Andrea C. Kramer, former Chief of the Civil Rights Division, Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office
  • Lon F. Povich, Chief Legal Counsel, Office of the Governor of Massachusetts

The panel was moderated by Rahsaan D. Hall, of the ACLU and Co-Chair of the BBA’s Civil Rights and Civil Liberties Section.

While the idea of judicial diversity is widely lauded, it is important to consider the factual reasons and underlying statistical support for its importance.  Judicial diversity is absolutely necessary for two major reasons – 1) it serves as a descriptive or symbolic representation of society at large, increasing public confidence in the judiciary; and 2) it serves as substantive representation, whereby a judiciary with more diverse judges assures diversity in perspective, experience, and empathy, potentially leading to more fair outcomes.  Related to this latter point, implicit bias, the idea that judges (and everyone else, for that matter) experience subtle cognitive processes that result in biases in judgment or behavior, has been a hot topic recently.  While the courts are taking steps, including trainings and a bench card with strategies for judges to recognize and overcome these biases as much as they can be eliminated, the argument goes that on a more diverse bench, the competing implicit biases will cancel each other out in order to achieve systemic fairness.

Statistics clearly show the importance of diversity on the bench, especially in certain areas of law.  For example, employment discrimination cases with an African American judge are more than two times more likely to result in a finding of racial harassment than those with only white judges.

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Similarly, in voting rights cases, having an African American judge on the panel increases the likelihood of finding a civil rights violation by 18%.

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For affirmative action cases before the U.S. Courts of Appeals, the panel is almost twice as likely to vote in favor of affirmative action if it contains at least one African-American judge.

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In criminal sentencing, the greater the percentage of female judges on a district’s bench, the smaller the gender disparity.  Perhaps this can be explained because female judges are more likely than their male counterparts to see women as able to commit crimes.  In cases on LGBTQ rights, women are more than 20% more likely to find a constitutional violation.

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Chief Justice Ireland gave an example from his time as a Juvenile Court judge when diversity played a role in providing perspective.  He explained that he regularly made custody decisions and felt that his upbringing may have made him more tolerant.  When a social worker would suggest that a child should be removed from a home that was in relative disrepair or had cockroaches, he explained, an individual from a middle class background might see the situation as abhorrent and meriting removal.  However, Chief Justice Ireland felt that he could sympathize with the lower-income parents who were doing their best in a challenging situation and might be more open to their retention of custody if he felt it was in the child’s best interest.

Judges also face bias.  In a set of 2014 studies completed by Massachusetts General Hospital psychologists and Harvard University professors, 10 years of anonymous judicial evaluations by attorneys demonstrated that black judges are rated far more negatively than their white counterparts.  They concluded, “the general theme that emerged [from focus groups] was the idea that persons of color do not match the expectations of what a judge should look like, and therefore confront more doubt, mistrust, and interpersonal tensions than do non-minority judges.”

Chief Justice Ordoñez explained that though she has gone through four phases of judicial evaluations, the one she remembers most vividly came from early in her career and accused her of being a judge only because of her minority status.  She said it made her feel horrible and was scarring.  She has since worked hard to become part of the solution, working to reform the evaluation questions and process to best and holistically measure the attributes and improvement needs of judges.  Andrea Kramer stressed that the issue is not about diversity versus competency – there are of course many competent judges and candidates across all categories, and with more diverse judges, there will likely be fewer evaluations based solely on negative perceptions of a judge’s background.

While Massachusetts ranks 11th nationally on a 2016 judicial diversity study conducted by the American Constitution Society, it still has a long way to go.  Currently, 56% of state court judges are white men, 30% are white women, 7% are men of color, and 7% are women of color.  Compare this with the state’s general population, comprised of 36% white men, 38% white women, 12% men of color and 13% women of color.  Still, as is often the case, Massachusetts is outpacing most other states.  Nationally only 30% of state judges are women (37% in MA) and the percentage difference between judicial representation and general population representation for individuals of color is 18% (compared with 11% in Massachusetts).

So what can we do to improve the status quo?  Governor’s Chief Legal Counsel Lon Povich spoke at the event (as he and we have before) about his office’s need for top candidates to  pursue judgeships.  It’s a simple message – the only way to have great and diverse judges is for great and diverse lawyers to apply.  Povich and the Governor have done their part by assembling a diverse Judicial Nominating Commission (likely the most diverse ever) to consider applicants, and by continuing to appoint diverse candidates – of the 17 judges appointed by Governor Baker so far, twelve are women, two are African American, and three self-identified as LGBTQ.  Now it’s up to the bar to apply for future openings.

Chief Justices Ireland and Ordoñez both spoke about their experiences with this process.  Ireland stressed that it was only a job application and urged applicants to keep trying until they get the job, without getting discouraged if at first they do not succeed.  He talked about not making it to the bench on his first application to the Boston Municipal Court and about later applying to the SJC three times before being selected to the state’s highest court, where he was eventually appointed Chief Justice.  Chief Justice Ordoñez and Andrea Kramer noted that organizations like the Women’s Bar Association help candidates with the application process and with mock interviews.

As always, we will do our best to keep you updated on the judicial application and review process.  We hope that diverse candidates will continue to apply so that the judiciary can increasingly reflect the diversity of the society that it serves.

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

 

SJC Overhaul

Gov Baker SJC Nominees

It’s been quite a week, with major implications for justice in the Commonwealth for years to come, as the Governor announced his three nominees for upcoming Supreme Judicial Court (SJC) vacancies on Tuesday.  The SJC is not only the highest appellate court in the state, issuing approximately 200 full bench written decisions and 600 single justice decisions annually, but its justices are also responsible for the “general superintendence” of the judiciary and the bar.  This function includes making, revising, and approving rules for the operations of the courts and providing advisory opinions to other branches of government.  For example, over the past few months, the BBA has taken part in commenting on proposed revisions to civil procedures for various court departments aimed at improving the cost-effectiveness of litigation.  This overhaul originated with the SJC and final revisions will be approved by an SJC led committee before being codified.  It is all but impossible to overstate the huge role this court plays for justice and legal practice in Massachusetts.

What is Changing?

Therefore, it is truly remarkable that this Court will be going through such a major change in its makeup in so short a time.  With five of the seven justices leaving by the end of next year, the first three replacements are only part of the picture.  The justices leaving before the court’s next session in September are Robert Cordy, Francis X. Spina and Fernande R.V. Duffly.

  • Robert Cordy – In February, Justice Cordy announced his early retirement (at age 66, four years short of the mandatory retirement age). He was appointed to the SJC by Governor Paul Cellucci in 2001.  Justice Cordy graduated from Harvard Law School and started his legal career with the Massachusetts Public Defenders Office.  He then worked for the Department of Revenue, the State Ethics Commission, as a Federal Prosecutor in the US Attorney’s Office in Massachusetts, as a partner at the law firm Burns & Levinson, and as Chief Legal Counsel to Governor William Weld.  Prior to his appointment to the SJC in 2001 by Governor Paul Cellucci, Cordy was Managing Partner in the Boston office of the international law firm of McDermott, Will & Emery.  He has served as Chair of the SJC Rules Committee and in leadership roles in a number of other court committees, including those focused on media and capital planning.  He has not yet announced his plans after stepping down from the state’s highest court.
  • Fernande Duffly – will retire on July 12, at the age of 67, a move she explained is to help her husband recover from a recent surgery. A native of Indonesia and a graduate of Harvard Law School, Justice Duffly started her legal career at a Boston law firm then known as Warner and Stackpole.  She served on the Probate and Family Court from 1992-2000, the Appeals Court from 2000 to 2011, and was appointed to the SJC in 2011 by Governor Deval Patrick, becoming the first Asian American member of that court.  Throughout her career she has demonstrated a commitment to supporting women and diversity in the law.
  • Francis Spina – From Pittsfield, Justice Spina graduated from Boston College Law School before working in legal services for two years. He eventually became an assistant district attorney before becoming a partner in a Pittsfield law firm.  He was appointed to the Superior Court in 1993, then to the Appeals Court in 1997, and to the SJC in 1999 by Governor Paul Cellucci.  He will reach the mandatory retirement age of 70 on November 13, 2016, but is stepping down on August 12.

Of the seven current SJC Justices, Spina and Cordy are the only two who were nominated to the SJC by Republicans (both by Paul Cellucci).  Obviously that is going to change soon as Republican Governor Charlie Baker starts to shape the court.  His three nominees to fill these spots are all former prosecutors and current Superior Court judges, Kimberly S. Budd, Frank M. Gaziano, and David A. Lowy.

  • Kimberly Budd – A resident of Newton and graduate of Harvard Law School, Budd began her legal career with the Boston law firm Mintz Levin. She then became an Assistant U.S. Attorney before serving as University Attorney for Harvard and later as Director of the Community Values program at Harvard Business School before her appointment to the Superior Court in 2009 by Governor Deval Patrick.  She served as a member of the BBA’s Education Committee from 2006 to 2007 and Council from 2003 to 2005 prior to her appointment to the bench.  After becoming a judge, she served on the Boston Bar Journal Board of Editors from 2012 to 2014.  Budd will be the second black female justice on the SJC after the 2014 appointment of Justice Geraldine Hines.
  • Frank Gaziano – Graduate of Suffolk University Law School, he started his legal career at the Boston law firm of Foley, Hoag & Eliot (now Foley Hoag). He also worked as a prosecutor in the Plymouth County District Attorney’s office and the U.S Attorney’s office.  Gaziano was appointed to the Superior Court in 2004 by Governor Mitt Romney.  He served on the Boston Bar Journal Board of Editors in 2011 and 2012.
  • David Lowy – A resident of Marblehead, and graduate of Boston University School of Law, David Lowy has served as a judge since 1997, first in District Court and then, since 2001, in Essex Superior Court. Prior to his appointment to the bench he worked as an associate at the Boston office of the law firm Goodwin, Procter & Hoar (now Goodwin Procter) and as an assistant district attorney.  He also worked as Deputy Legal Counsel to Governor William Weld from 1992 to 1995, under whom Governor Baker also served as a cabinet secretary.

The Process

These three nominees emerged thanks to the hard work of a special 12-member Supreme Judicial Court Nominating Commission (Special JNC) established by the Governor in February to assist the current Judicial Nominating Commission (JNC) in vetting all of the SJC applicants and nominees.  BBA President Lisa Arrowood is a member of this panel along with a number of former BBA leaders.  The Special JNC is co-chaired the Governor’s Chief Legal Counsel Lon Povich and former BBA President Paul Dacier, who is also chair of the JNC and executive vice president and general counsel of EMC Corporation.  The other members include:

  • Former SJC Chief Justice Roderick Ireland;
  • Roberto Braceras, Vice-Chair, JNC, and Partner, Goodwin Procter LLP;
  • Brackett Denniston, retired General Counsel of GE;
  • Retired Superior Court Justice Margaret Hinkle;
  • Marsha Kazarosian, immediate Past President, Massachusetts Bar Association, and partner, Kazarosian Costello;
  • Joan Lukey, Partner, Choate Hall & Stewart, LLP;
  • Elizabeth Lunt, Of Counsel, Zalkind Duncan & Bernstein;
  • John Pucci, Partner, Bulkley, Richardson and Gelinas, LLP; and
  • Carol Vittorioso, Vice-Chair, JNC, Partner, Vittorioso & Taylor.

We have explained the JNC before, but, to briefly review, the JNC is a group of diverse individuals appointed by the Governor (the regular JNC has 21 members, while the Special JNC has 12), with great knowledge and experience with the court system.  Members of the bar must have at least seven years of practice experience.  The JNC provides a first layer of review for judicial nominees – identifying and inviting applications by qualified individuals, reviewing applications, and interviewing candidates.  The group conducts votes requiring an increasing number of approving Commissioners at various steps of the process, narrowing down the list of individuals until a final vote requiring a 2/3 majority is conducted to see which applicants’ names will be submitted to the Governor for consideration for nomination.  They typically provide between three and six candidates for each vacancy.  The Governor’s Office then selects its candidates, here, Budd, Gaziano, and Lowy.

What’s Next?

The next step is approval by the Governor’s Council, a group of eight individuals elected every two years and the Lieutenant Governor, who serves ex-officio as president of the Council.  The Councilors review the nominee’s backgrounds, interview them, and hold open hearings where their supporters and opponents have the chance to speak.  The three candidates have already been approved by past iterations of the Council as they are all currently on the bench, but nothing can be taken for granted.

In fact, the process is already garnering media attention as the Council has taken issue with Lt. Gov. Karyn Polito’s plan to preside over the confirmation hearings.  Councilors typically preside over confirmation hearings for lower court judges, but it has been common practice in recent years for the lieutenant governor to preside over hearings for SJC nominees.  However, Councilors challenged Polito, alleging that her presence at the upcoming confirmation hearings will be an unfair publicity grab and was disrespectful to the Council members.  Polito cited historical precedent for her intended role.

The schedule for nominee hearings is set and we look forward to keeping you updated on their progress.  The hearings are all at 9:00 am in Room 428 of the State House as follows:

  • July 6: Judge Frank Gaziano
  • July 20: Judge David Lowy
  • August 3: Judge Kimberly Budd

Finally, keep in mind that this is only the beginning.  The SJC overhaul continues next year as Justices Margot Botsford and Geraldine Hines will both reach mandatory retirement age, Botsford in March and Hines in October.  While we don’t know who will come to the fore as nominees then, a couple of qualifications to look for include:

  • A resident of western Massachusetts – Francis Spina, the only Justice from this region, hails from Pittsfield, and is retiring this year. Nominee Kimberly Budd is the daughter of former U.S. Attorney Wayne Budd, a native of Springfield, but she grew up in Peabody and lives in Newton.  When asked about geographical diversity at his press conference to introduce the nominees, the Governor urged patience.
  • A judge from the Appeals Court – Governor’s Councilor Eileen Duff questioned, as did the Boston Herald, why none of the current nominees came from this court, experience she felt would prepare them well for the SJC.

Throughout this process, the Governor has frequently repeated that he is simply looking for the best candidates.  He and his office continue to encourage strong candidates to apply and are committed to continuing the remarkable traditions of the SJC.  However, the maintenance of a great and diverse bench relies on a great and diverse candidate pool.  The Governor has done his part by creating a remarkably diverse JNC and Special JNC under all metrics from geography to demographics to practice field and size.  It is up to candidates now to apply.  We look forward to seeing what the state’s highest court looks like at the end of this process.

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

Taking on Tough Issues: Chief Justice Gants on the Judiciary

gants croppedWe recently had the pleasure of welcoming the Chief Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court (SJC), Ralph D. Gants, to our building.  He addressed members of our Council, speaking on a myriad of issues currently facing the court system and the state at large.  We’ve got the recap below, but we also invite you attend the upcoming Haskell Cohn Award ceremony, at which we will be honoring the Chief for his distinguished judicial service.

Known for going out into the community to teach people about the Massachusetts courts and the practical role that they play in our lives, Chief Justice Gants has long demonstrated that he cares deeply about ensuring that the justice system works for everyone. He has actively worked to leverage limited resources wisely and to inspire the commitment of new resources to promote that goal.

Since his appointment to the bench as a Superior Court Judge in 1997, Chief Justice Gants has earned a reputation for scrupulous analytic rigor, intellectual honesty and fairness. Prior to his elevation to the SJC in 2009, he was a strong leader of the Business Litigation Session. Throughout his judicial career, and especially since his appointment as Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court in 2014, he has consistently shown a laser like ability to focus on the core issues in even the most complex of cases. He neither shies away from nor glosses over the most difficult issues, but rather grapples with them openly.  This includes access to justice and pro bono legal service – Chief Justice Gants is a former Chair of the Massachusetts Access to Justice Commission and member of the SJC’s Standing Committee on Pro Bono Legal Services.  In 2012, the BBA recognized him with the Citation of Judicial Excellence.

Here are some of the issues he addressed in his speech:

State Budget

Chief Justice Gants began with some news on the budget.  He analogized the budget process to a baseball game, stating that we were in the later innings and had scored some runs, but still had some more innings to go and work to do to convince legislators of the judiciary’s funding needs.  He acknowledged how challenging the budget situation is; even though the state economy appears healthy by many indicators, most revenue gains are already spoken-for due to constant growth in certain key areas such as health care.

As it currently stands, the Governor, House, and Senate have all released their budget proposals.  A conference committee will shortly be addressing differences between the House and Senate proposals.  Here is a brief breakdown of the line items we are most interested in:

  • Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation (MLAC – funding for civil legal aid)
    • House: $18,500,000
    • Senate: $18,000,000
  • Trial Court
    • House: $639,900,000 (includes Specialty Courts module)
    • Senate: $643,484,303 (does not include Specialty Courts module)
  • Statewide Housing Court Expansion
    • House: $0
    • Senate: $1,194,614

Click here for a full analysis of all our budget priorities.

Justice System Reforms

Civil

Chief Justice Gants then discussed reforms currently under consideration for both civil and criminal practice.  Following his lead on the need for  a “menu of options” in civil litigation, each department of the Trial Court (aside from the Juvenile Court), examined their civil practices, and most are in the process of finalizing streamlining proposals that will give lawyers more practice options.  However, the Chief Justice stressed, giving lawyers more choices matters only if lawyers actually take advantage of them.  He encouraged lawyers to try out the new options when they are implemented and hoped that practitioners would be pleased with the outcomes – fair and fast resolutions of their cases on the micro level, and a more efficient court system on the whole as a result.

Once this is accomplished, it may lead to larger systemic changes.  For example, the Trial Court is examining increasing the minimum procedural amount to qualify for Superior Court from $25,000 to $50,000.  This change would approximately represent an adjustment for inflation (the amount has stayed the same since 1986), but would also result in shifting a large number of cases from the Superior Court to the District Court level.  Implementation of this change is currently on hold, at least until devoted civil sessions in the District Courts are operating at peak efficiency.

Criminal

On the criminal front, the Chief Justice spoke highly of the work of the Council of State Governments, which is examining criminal justice policy in Massachusetts at the joint request—and with the guidance—of  the Chief Justice, the Governor, the Senate President, and the Speaker of the House.   The Council will be making recommendations for criminal justice reforms in the Commonwealth in the coming months.

Chief Justice Gants has already taken the lead on this issue in the judiciary, installing best practices for sentencing in all criminal courts.  He explained that going forward, the judiciary is looking more closely at issues such as sentence length and post-release conditions (currently about 40% of people are released from prison without any form of supervision), as well as tailoring sentences individually for each defendant.  The court is also focused on monetary issues, such as determining individuals’ ability to pay court fees and increasing the baseline amount for certain crimes, such as larceny, to qualify as a felony.

Access to Justice

Finally, Chief Justice Gants addressed his work with the Conference of Chief Justices, which recently adopted a resolution as part of a national effort to achieve “100% access to justice.”  While that phrase can mean many things, Chief Justice Gants is focused on maximizing both legal and non-legal resources so litigants can get the help they need, from self-help forms, to brief advice, to full representation from a lawyer, depending on the individual’s abilities and the complexity of their issue(s).  The biggest current challenge is figuring out how to allocate resources to achieve the most effective “triage.”  Other states are working to address the same questions, and he hopes we can benefit from some of their research and innovations.  Meanwhile, Massachusetts remains a leader in access to justice – as recognized by the National Center for Access to Justice’s recently-released 2016 Justice Index, which ranks us second only to the District of Columbia – and continues to expand empowering programs and initiatives, such as opening more Court Service Centers in courts across the state.

As always, the Chief Justice demonstrated his deep knowledge of the courts and justice system at large as well as his energetic push for meaningful and beneficial reforms to assure efficient practice and access to justice for all.  We are extremely pleased to be honoring him at next week’s Haskell Cohn ceremony and hope that you will join us in recognizing his remarkable and ever-increasing achievements.

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

Budget Update

The Senate is finalizing its budget and we have the latest updates below.  After that it is on to a conference committee to settle discrepancies between the House and Senate. Here is a breakdown of where things currently stand (updated to reflect the latest Senate budget debate):

Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation (MLAC)

  • Request: $27,000,000
  • Governor’s Budget: $17,170,000
  • House Ways and Means Budget: $18,000,000
  • House Final Budget: $18,500,000
  • Senate Ways and Means Budget: $17,000,000
  • Senate Final: $18,000,000

The Senate adopted a $1 million amendment (#1000) co-sponsored by Senators Creem and Brownsberger during its budget debate.  MLAC funding will now be debated in Conference, where we hope the House number of $18,500,000 will be adopted.

Trial Court

  • Request: $654,374,856 + Modules
  • Governor’s Budget: $638,606,000
  • House Ways and Means Budget: $639,900,000 (including Specialty Courts module)
  • House Final Budget: $639,900,000 (including Specialty Courts module)
  • Senate Ways and Means Budget: $643,484,303
  • Senate Final Budget: $643,484,303

We were pleased to see that the Senate budget proposal is roughly $3.5 million higher than the proposed House appropriation.  We were also pleased to see that it included language and funding for statewide expansion of the Housing Court (more on that below).

However, we were disappointed that the Specialty Court module, funded by the House, was left out of the Senate’s budget plan.  We were proud to recognize the remarkable work of the Specialty Courts at last week’s Law Day Dinner, and the $2.8 million Specialty Courts module would allow for their expansion statewide, giving access to justice for some of the most vulnerable populations and helping to treat issues underlying criminal behavior, such as homelessness, drug abuse, and mental health or veterans issues with support and dignity in order to curb recidivism.  We hope that the final budget can include adequate funding for the Trial Court as well as funding for statewide expansion of both the Housing and Specialty Courts.

Statewide Housing Court Expansion

  • Request: $2,400,000
  • Governor’s Budget: $1,000,000
  • House Ways and Means Budget: $0
  • House Final Budget: $0
  • Senate Ways and Means Budget: $1,194,614
  • Senate Final Budget: $1,194,614

The BBA has been advocating for the statewide expansion of Housing Court for the last year. Housing Court has statutory jurisdiction over civil and criminal cases which involve the health, safety, or welfare of the occupants or owners of residential housing, as well as code enforcement cases. One of its greatest strength is that its judges are experienced in these issues and best able to address the complexities and nuances of each case.

The total cost to the state for the expansion is estimated to be roughly $2.4 million per year.  The Governor’s budget included $1 million for Specialty Court, enough to get it started and operational for 6 months, but the House did not follow his lead, leaving this measure out of its budget entirely.  We were pleased to see that the Senate provided similar language and funding to the Governor’s proposal, and we hope that this will remain in the final state budget and be included in the final budget.

We look forward to keeping you updated on the latest budget developments and, as always, urge you to make your voice heard at the State House.

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

Real Estate Law Section Comments on Land Court Efficiency Proposals

land court comment pic

Last week, the Boston Bar Association (BBA) submitted comments to the Land Court in response to its request for feedback on proposed Rule 14 and Standing Order 1-16. These proposals grew out of the Supreme Judicial Court and Chief Justice Ralph Gants’ efforts to improve judicial efficiency by offering litigants a “menu of options” for civil litigation. Both proposals are the work of the Land Court’s Alternative Litigation Options Working Group (Working Group), which included three current and former members of the BBA’s Real Estate Law Section – Daniel Dain of Dain Torpy, Michael Fee of Pierce & Mandell, and Johanna Schneider of Rackemann, Sawyer & Brewster.

Proposed Land Court Rule 14 would permit the Court to make binding summary decisions without making findings of fact and without stating separately the Court’s conclusions of law following a trial or evidentiary hearing, and only upon voluntary stipulation by the interested parties. Proposed Standing Order 1-16 authorizes the Court, after discussion with counsel, to order limited discovery and schedule an early trial.

The BBA’s Real Estate Law Section Steering Committee discussed all of the Working Group’s proposals and drafted comments, noting their general approval of the increased efficiency these proposals may allow as well as some specific comments they hoped the Court would consider, including:

  • Urging the Court to consider, in order to protect client interests, requiring both counsel and clients to execute stipulations to allow the Court to make expedited Proposed Rule 14 decisions.
  • Expressing concerns about how decisions under Proposed Rule 14 would be reviewed at an appellate level.
  • Requesting that the Court clarify its discretion under Proposed Rule 14 on when it can disregard the parties’ stipulations.
  • Requesting more guidance on the Court’s power to accept or reject undisclosed documents under Proposed Standing Order 1-16, specifically questioning whether the Court could hold as inadmissible, witnesses or documents that were not initially disclosed, and also whether parties discovering a claim or defense that was not initially contemplated could be barred from asserting them.

Read the full comments here.

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association

BBA Advocacy in DC – ABA Day 2016

Last week, we made our annual trip to Washington, D.C., for the 20th ABA Day—the annual event that brings bar-association leaders to the capital for three days of meetings with members of Congress and their staffs, trainings and briefings, awards and speeches, and mingling with lawyers from across the nation.

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Mark Smith and Carol Starkey on the US Capitol Underground Tram 

This year, the BBA was represented by President-Elect Carol Starkey, of Conn Kavanaugh, and Vice-President Mark Smith, of Laredo & Smith.  They were joined in Washington by the MBA President Bob Harnais and Vice-President Jeff Catalano.  In one whirlwind 24-hour period (all right, make that 26 hours, to be precise), the group visited the offices of 10 out of our 11 Senators and Representatives, to advocate on issues of great importance to both the ABA and the Massachusetts bar.

One constant theme of ABA Day, year after year, is the importance of federal funding for the Legal Services Corporation (LSC), which in turn doles out support to legal-aid organizations at the state level.  In the current FY16 budget, the ABA was able to secure a $10 million increase in LSC’s appropriation—no easy lift at a time of fiscal restraint and polarization in Congress.  For FY17, with current funding still 15.7% lower than it was in 2010 (inflation adjusted), we argued for a substantial increase, from $385 million to $475 million.

In making this case to our delegation, we were helped once again by the October 2014 report of the BBA’s Statewide Task Force to Expand Civil Legal Aid in Massachusetts, which found that—in addition to being the right thing to do, to offer legal assistance to low-income residents in need and to reduce delays in our courts—increased funding for legal aid produces a return on investment, by saving the government on “back-end” costs such as health care for domestic-violence victims, emergency shelter after evictions or foreclosures, and foster care for children.  (We continue to use this report as the basis of our campaign for state funding for the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation.  Stay tuned until next week for an update on this and all our other budget priorities.)

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Left to Right: Rep. Joe Kennedy, Bob Harnais, Mark Smith, and Carol Starkey

One of the leaders on this subject in Congress is our own Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy III (Brookline), who co-founded the bipartisan Access to Civil Legal Services Caucus this past fall, alongside a GOP colleague from Indiana, Rep. Susan Brooks.  At one of the ABA Day breakfasts, we heard Rep. Kennedy give an impassioned speech about the critical importance of legal aid.  Later that day, he ducked out of a committee mark-up session to meet with us.

The second issue we discussed with our elected officials was criminal-justice reform.  The ABA has endorsed legislation pending in Congress to address sentencing of both adults and juveniles.  This is an area that has seen tremendous movement in recent years, with dozens of states taking action to restructure their criminal-justice systems so as to relieve over-incarceration, reduce expenditures, and promote successful re-entry—all while protecting public safety.  (Here in Massachusetts, a similar effort is underway, with leadership from all three branches of government working with the Council of State Governments on a year-long comprehensive review that is expected to lead to legislation early next year.)

We were told by a number of legislators that there is a growing bipartisan consensus in support of such bills, with the main lingering questions being how to address the fine print, and whether enactment might happen in the near-term, during a Presidential campaign, or will have to wait until a lame-duck session after the election.

The last item on our agenda, in meetings with our delegation, is mandatory accrual accounting for law firms and other types of personal service businesses, which would have a deleterious effect, especially on smaller firms, by requiring them to book revenue, and pay taxes on it, even before it has actually been received.  This was proposed a few years ago, but thanks to a concerted campaign by the ABA—in which the BBA took part—it was shot down.  However, no idea is ever truly dead in Congress, and we must remain vigilant in case such language re-emerges.  For that reason, it’s important to convey to our representatives that the issue is still on our radar screens.

Fortunately, all Massachusetts Senators and Representatives who were in office during the last session signed onto a letter opposing mandatory accrual accounting, so we know we have their support on this should we need it.

In fact, we enjoy support virtually across-the-board from our delegation on all these priorities.  So for the BBA and the MBA, unlike representatives from many other states, these visits are not about changing minds but rather about conveying our appreciation for their positions.  We have it relatively easy compared to, say, ABA President-Elect Linda Klein, who spoke at one event about the challenge of trying to persuade some members of Congress from her home state of Georgia.

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Left to Right: Lee Constantine, Jeff Catalano, Carol Starkey, Mark Smith, Sen. Markey, Bob Harnais, Mike Avitzur

Regardless of the circumstances, it is always a pleasure to have a chance to sit down with national leaders like Sen. Edward Markey, who spoke about two legal internships he held while at Boston College Law School.  Those experiences demonstrated to him first-hand the importance of providing legal representation to low-income residents, and they undergird his long-standing support for legal-aid funding.  He also expressed dismay that the crushing burden of law-school debt is driving too many new attorneys away from public service—the path he chose—after graduation.

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Left to Right: Bob Harnais, Jeff Catalano, Sen. Warren, Carol Starkey, Mark Smith

As an expert in bankruptcy, Sen. Elizabeth Warren understands how legal-services attorneys created the common law around the then-new bankruptcy law 25 years ago, back when there was much more funding; now, the federal government doesn’t provide money for legal services to take on bankruptcy cases.  Sen. Warren called the LSC appropriation “crumbs” in the context of the federal budget, and assured us that she’ll continue to fight for a justice system that “feels fair”—not one that works only for the wealthy.  Her commitment to legal services is demonstrated by her recent hiring of Stephanie Akpa as Counsel.  Stephanie previously worked for the Legal Aid Society of the District of Columbia and is advising the Senator on Judiciary Committee matters, such as the sentencing reform we had come to advocate for.  Sen. Warren noted that while most Senators use their limited office payroll for staffers to the committees on which they sit, she chose instead to assign Judiciary to Stephanie because of the priority the Senator places on those issues, even though she is not a member of that committee.

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Left to Right: Jeff Catalano, Carol Starkey, Bob Harnais, Rep. McGovern, Mark Smith

From Rep. James McGovern (Worcester), we heard stories from the night he recently spent in a homeless shelter in his district.  This issue is personal for him—he held a hearing on poverty earlier this month as well—so he understands the importance of lawyers in helping to keep people in their homes.  He also applauded our efforts on criminal justice, noting the need to focus on early intervention to help juvenile offenders turn their lives around, and re-entry efforts to give ex-offenders a real chance to “have a life.”

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Left to Right: Jeff Catalano, Carol Starkey, Rep. Capuano, Bob Harnais, Mark Smith

Rep. Michael Capuano (Somerville) called sentencing reform “the most hopeful thing we might work on this year,” saying this is the first time in his life that the potential exists for positive action.  He told us he’s always opposed mandatory minimums (as does the BBA): “I know the difference between a criminal and someone who made a mistake,” he said, but mandatory sentences ignore that distinction.  They also lead in some cases to criminalization of a health problem; the Congressman doesn’t want anyone to have to rob his mother’s house in order to feed their addiction.

During the foreclosure crisis, Rep. Katherine Clark (Melrose) saw how difficult it was for her constituents to get access to legal assistance, and how this led to many of them losing their homes.  So she knows all about the justice gap from her service in both the House and Senate in Massachusetts, where she worked tirelessly to try to close it.  Now, she’s brought that commitment with her to D.C.  Indeed, she won the Equal Justice Coalition’s Champion of Justice award in 2014 for her work on behalf of legal-aid funding at both the state and the federal level.  We have her support on this, as well as on sentencing reform.

As the 114th Congress continues its work, we’ll keep an eye on all these issues, and we’ll be back in D.C. again in 2017 for the 21st annual ABA Day.

— Michael Avitzur
Government Relations Director
Boston Bar Association

Focused on the Budget – BBA Update

In addition to yesterday’s budget member alert, we have been busy with advocacy of our own.  At the same time we asked you to contact your Representatives, we sent a letter to Speaker of the House Robert DeLeo, explaining the need for adequate funding for the three issues described above.  We have also been meeting with state and national leaders to discuss our budget priorities.

State Representative Meetings

Earlier this week, former BBA President and Chair of the BBA Statewide Task Force to Expand Civil Legal Aid in Massachusetts, J.D. Smeallie, met with Speaker Pro Tempore Patricia Haddad’s office and Assistant Majority Leader Byron Rushing.  More meetings are scheduled in the coming weeks.  Smeallie has spent the last 18 months educating legislators on the findings of the Task Force’s Investing in Justice Report and is devoted to raising awareness of the need for increased legal aid funding.  Through surveys of civil legal aid agencies, the Task Force found that 64% of those eligible for legal aid, at 125% of the federal poverty level, are turned away annually due to lack of resources.  This lack of resources is due in-part to the nearly $30 million decrease in IOLTA funding over the last decade due to fewer deals and plummeting interest rates (more on this below).

This drop in funding caused legal aid organizations to lay-off attorneys and support staff, resulting in an increased number of pro se litigants navigating the courts.  Unrepresented litigants cause delays, take up the time and efforts of judges and court staff, and often struggle to access justice, as demonstrated in a survey of judges conducted by the Task Force.  Finally, the Report demonstrates that investment in civil legal aid yields positive returns, helping the state to save on back end costs such as shelter, police, and medical expenses, as well as bring money into the state through federal benefits.  The Report demonstrate that every $1 invested in civil legal aid serving evictions, domestic violence, and federal benefits, yields $2-$5 dollars in returns to the state.

Congressional Delegation Meetings

At the same time, BBA President-Elect Carol Starkey, Vice President Mark Smith, and Director of Government Relations and Public Affairs, Mike Avitzur, have spent the last two days in Washington, DC, at ABA Day with their counterparts from the MBA.

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From Left to Right: MBA President Bob Harnais, MBA President-Elect Jeffrey Catalano, Senator Elizabeth Warren, BBA President-Elect Carol Starkey, BBA Vice President Mark Smith

In addition to discussing mass incarceration issues and opposition to accrual accounting for law firms, our delegation is advocating for increased funding for the Legal Services Corporation (LSC), the federally funded non-profit corporation the promotes equal access to justice and provide grants for high-quality civil legal assistance for low-income Americans.  LSC provided four legal aid programs in Massachusetts with just over $5 million in FY2016.  In recent years, similar funding has yielded roughly 11,000 to 13,000 cases closed annually.  Stay tuned for a longer write-up on our ABA Day meetings on this blog next week.

Council Meeting

On Tuesday, we heard from MAIOLTA Director Jayne Tyrrell who spoke to the BBA Council about ways lawyers and law firms can maximize their IOLTA contributions, which in turn benefit civil legal aid organizations.  As noted above, IOLTA is one of the largest funders of civil legal aid, but due to historically low interest rates, its funding amounts have decreased dramatically.  While federal interest rates remain low, banks vary in their individual offerings, thus it matters where lawyers and law firms do their banking.  In Massachusetts, more than 40 banks have signed-on as Leadership Banks, agreeing to pay a minimum of 1% interest on IOLTA accounts.  Here is the full list.  Tyrrell encouraged all lawyers and law firms to consider banking with one of the listed banks for the benefits their interest rates will provide for civil legal aid.

At the same meeting, we heard from Governor’s Chief Legal Counsel, Lon Povich.  He spoke on the budget as well, noting that both the Governor’s proposed budget and the budget issued by the House Ways & Means Committee contain no new taxes or fees.  The Governor’s FY17 budget proposal contained a 1% increase for civil legal aid and the courts, in addition to $1 million and enacting language for statewide expansion of the Housing Court.  While the House Ways & Means budget proposal included slightly larger increases for the Trial Court and MLAC, it did not include language or funding for Housing Court expansion.

Povich also discussed the work of the Massachusetts Criminal Justice Review undertaken by the Council of State Governments, and under the sponsorship of the Governor, Chief Justice of the SJC, Senate President and Speaker of the House, as well as the process  to fill vacancies on the SJC and other courts.  Both are still ongoing and we look forward to their forthcoming results.

The budget process continues through June, and we will continue to advocate for adequate funding for our priority issues and hope that you will as well – starting with contacting your Representative as explained above.  We will keep you updated on how the budget progresses and will likely be reaching out at other key points to request your help again.  Thank you in advance!

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association